Category Archives: Life & Style

The University of Westminster talks about Mental Health and Exam Season

In a study done by ChildLine, it was found that 68% of students are anxious about their grades and exams and the effect it has on their future.

The study also said that 65% of children who had to do referrals were suicide related – this only emphasises the stress students face to get the best grades in their class, not taking into consideration their mental health.

Petsa Kaffens, a lecturer and personal tutor at the University, says that “People take on too much. They have lots of hopes and dreams and raise them too high to get work done in time. At least that’s my opinion”

For the first time, in a ChildLine study school and education problems appeared in the top ten concerns with a 200 per cent increase in counselling about exam stress. Counselling services can be found at the University of Westminster, either with personal tutors or the mental health team.

Some students like Lucy Tonge, had this to say about the de-stress week at Westminster and why it shouldn’t only be once a year.

The University of Westminster prides itself in helping the mental health and well-being of students. You can email the University for help at counselling@westminster.ac.uk, or call them at +44 (0)20 7911 5000 ext 68229 if you need professional help.

 

 

Which types of treatments are available to reduce the risk of heart failure?

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With recent research showing an increase in heart failure by consuming too much non-prescriptive drugs such as ibuprofen. Are there any other factors that need to be considered that can contribute to the increased risk of heart failure?

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Diclofenac – 50%   Ibuprofen – 48%

Naproxen – 53%     Rofecoxib – 58%

Source: NHS

 

Treatments for heart failure:

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor – The inhibitor opens the blood vessels to allow the heart to pump blood around the body more smoothly.

Beta-blockers – These are used to reduce the heart rate by reducing the effects of adrenaline which increases the heart rate and blood pressure of the body.

Hydralazine with nitrate – This tends to prescribed by a cardiologist as some patients cannot take an ACE inhibitor. The drug is used to relax the blood vessels.

Diuretics – These are designed to reduce ankle swelling and breathlessness by causing the body to remove large quantities of urine.

Digoxin – Is used to strengthen cardiac muscle contraction as well as reducing heart rate.

Is it worth worrying about your ibuprofen usage?

Research into anti-inflammatory tablets has clarified that this medication is closely linked to heart attacks. The study which was conducted at the University of Montreal has received a huge amount of coverage, but should it concern you?

This research is reminder that NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) are not harmless; although these drugs have already been linked to heart failure and strokes in the past, they are still sold all over the country in supermarkets where no professional advice is given on how to take the drugs correctly.

What did the research highlight?

The research explored health records of around eight million patients who had an average age of 77 and whether or not they had used NSAIDs, such as: ibuprofen, aspirin and naproxen.

People who had used NSAID were found to have a 19 per cent higher chance of being admitted to hospital for heart failure. However, many news outlets also failed to point out that drugs like diclofenac are more dangerous than ibuprofen which the articles seemed to be focused more heavily on.

How was the media coverage of the story?

A large quantity of the coverage failed to highlight how the correlation between anti-inflammatory medication and heart problems was already well known.

The story received a huge amount attention from various media outlets and tended to exaggerate the research which had been conducted. Here are some of the titles:

  • Ibuprofen WARNING: Regular usage for just ONE week ‘increases heart attack risk’
  • Common painkillers may raise risk of heart attack by 100%
  • Taking ibuprofen to treat pain ‘for just ONE DAY increases your risk of heart attack by half’

What was the view of experts?

Professor Peter Weissberg, Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation stated in response to growing concerns about the consumption of NSAIDs that, “It has been known for some years now that such drugs need to be used with caution in patients with, or at high risk of, heart disease. This applies mostly to those who take them on a daily basis rather than only occasionally.”

Chief medical officer at the Australian Heart Foundation, Garry Jennings stated, “There is really no information which suggests that they can cause either a cardiac arrest or a heart attack out of the blue. I think that is very unlikely.”

The overuse of NSAIDs can lead to various complications such as: stomach ulcers, and liver and kidney problems. Jennings stated, “They’re not smarties, they’re serious medications.”

 

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So what should I do?

Researchers have highlighted how ibuprofen can still be taken, but consumers should stick to small doses and only take it for as long as it really has to be. It is also important to remember that you can always look for nondrug treatments, such as ice packs and muscle sprays for any inflammation which you may be facing.

 

Listen to more about the issue below, with interviews from various professionals questioned about some of the points above:

6 tips that will definitely not help with exams

With Exam season coming, here are some tips that will definitely help with your revision.

 

  1. Get drunk. Every day, every night, getting drunk is a fantastic way to procrastinate and spend an unnecessary amount of money.  giphy3
  2. Start a new series. Netflix was made for the exam season, why not try Archer or Orange is The New Black?  With hundreds of hours already on Netflix you can be sure that you won’t even think about starting revision.    giphy2
  3. Create a Pinterest, want to start planning the home you want to buy, or the holiday you won’t be able to afford because you spent too much time browsing the web than studying? Pinterest is the place to go. giphy5
  4. Find out what kitchen appliance you would be. Buzzfeed offer a number of pointless yet entertaining quizzes that are a  sure fire way to de-stress you and waste hours on finding yourself rather than revising.                                                                                  giphy4
  5. Tidy the house. It’s a great way to feel productive whilst still not doing the thing you’re supposed to be doing. While you’re at it why don’t you re-arrange your room? After all, a clean space = a clean mind.  giphy6
  6. When you’re really stuck for things to do you have to go to the last resort, phoning your parents. It may not be the most exciting thing and you’ll definitely get moaned at for something, maybe like, not doing your revision? giphy7

De-stress with The University of Westminster

Kicking off exam season, the Student Union at the University of Westminster has organised a de-stress week that includes a nap room, free yoga classes and a handful of fluffy animals to deal with the stress of examinations.

According to a study by ChildLine in 2014, 58 per cent of counselling sessions in relation to school and education problems were about exam stress, a 200 per cent rise from the previous year. Now in 2017, It seems that the number is still rising as teens take to twitter to complain about their overbearing amount of work.

The Nap Room runs from May 8th to May 12th, and its Facebook event page can be found here. The Union started taking action due to the overwhelming amount of work students are facing with final year assessments and exam revision. One of the most famous and sold-out events of de-stress week is the puppy and bunny room, that allows students to play with adorable animals to calm them down from dissertations and final projects.

Pictures: University of Westminster Facebook Page

 

The University began the idea of bunny and puppy day last year and kept it this year due to the high demands. You can see the video of the day below.

Video: Smoke TV

With rising concern for exam stress and its effect on students, there is also a concern about eating disorders and self-harm being at a combined total of 34,000 people who use ChildLine yearly.

A press release from the University Health Awareness Day 2017 claims that, undergraduate students appear to have a lower sense of personal wellbeing than the rest of the population with 21% of students experiencing ‘low anxiety’ compared to 41% of the total population and 43% of the equivalent age group. [The 2016 Student Academic Experience Survey, HEPI]

De-stress week at the University of Westminster will help with students mental health and focus on student successes during exam season.

Ibuprofen and the side effects

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What is ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen is a painkiller that is used to counteract toothache, fevers as well as swelling.  Ibuprofen is a non-prescriptive drug that can be purchased at any store.

Ibuprofen is most known to be a tablet but it can also be available as a capsule, liquid or a type of gel.

It usually takes between 20-30 minutes to have any effect. If applied to the skin it can take up to two days to have any effect.

 

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Source: Refluxcentar

What are the side effects of taking too much Ibuprofen?

If there is a high concentration of ibuprofen in the body; it can lead to vomiting, tiredness and breathing difficulties.

It is recommended by the NHS that you take the box of the of the ibuprofen with you, should you feel any of the above symptoms.

For more stories such as this:

Risk of heart attacks from common painkillers

 

Risk of heart attacks from common painkillers

A new study suggests that there is a link between the frequent use of anti-inflammatory painkillers, for example: ibuprofen, and heart attacks.

Research shows that using these forms of painkillers would raise the risk of heart attack, ‘between 24 and 58 per cent overall’ in comparison with not using painkillers

The new study suggests that taking ibuprofen and other anti-inflammatory’s increases the likelihood of having a heart attack within the first month of taking them if consumed in high doses.

Research conducted throughout 2013 found that a years worth of high-does treatment with ibuprofen and diclofenac (a treatment used by thousands of arthritis sufferers in the UK) causes three avoidable heart attacks and one fatal heart attack for every 1,000 users.

 

 

It was stated by Michèle Bally of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre that, “Taking any dose of NSAIDs for one week, one month, or more than a month was associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction [heart attack].”

It is clear that doctors should consider both the positives and negatives when it comes to prescribing drugs, as sometimes they can create more dangerous issues.

So should you be worried? For most people under the age of 65 and those without heart problems, the answer is no. Most doctors also already try to avoid prescribing anti-inflammatory medication to people with these issues. The worries about these types of drugs also seem to only apply to those individuals who take the tablets on a daily basis.

 

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