Clap for pay?

Today marks the seventh week of the clap for the NHS.

The ‘clap for the NHS’ began on the 26th of March as a way for the British residents to publicly recognise the efforts put in by the millions of NHS workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic.

The response by the public towards the NHS has been all but inspirational with people coming to their doorsteps or windows every Thursday at 8pm to raise their hands for the brave medical workers.

NHS workers have been receiving a tremendous amount of support. Food deliveries are being made to hospitals as well as workspaces throughout day and night to support those who may not have time to shop. Individual donations are also helping those who need more, get by.

Despite this, many of the British public and NHS workers believe that the ‘clap’ has been used to eclipse the key message of this period. Speaking to NHS Nurse, Emmanuel, he told WNOL,

“I am grateful that the public were taking time to acknowledge the situation we are in, but it really isn’t doing anything to change our situation. The clap does not give me strength, it just makes me realise how far the government will go to distract us all.”

The efforts put in by many of the key workers have been noticed by many, but the pay they receive doesn’t measure up with their recognition. For years and most recently, NHS workers have been crying out for increased pay, most significantly during this tough period.

Currently, the median salary for ‘full-time NHS workers’ is £30,353.

On the large social media platform, Twitter, many other British residents have come together to voice their dissatisfaction of the clapping ‘stunt’.

As the situation steadily continues to get better, will the government look to reward the NHS for their hard work after this horrendous period.

Later today, the public will once again take to their doors and windows to clap for our key workers. The clap will begin at 8pm GMT and will last for two minutes.

Photo credit: clap for our carers

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s